• High Technology Crime Investigation Association (HTCIA)—formed to provide education and collaboration to global members for the prevention and investigation of high tech crimes. https://www.htcia.org/
  • American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors/Laboratory Accreditation Board (ASCLD/LAB)—a not-for-profit corporation specializing in the accreditation of public and private crime laboratories.  Its sole source of financial support is revenue from assessment and accreditation activities.  Since 1982, they have been committed to the ongoing support, education and oversight of facilities striving for excellence in forensic analysis. http://www.ascld-lab.org/
  • International Society of Forensic Computer Examiners (ISFCE)—a private organization dedicated to providing an internationally recognized, unblemished, computer forensics certification that is available to all who can qualify. The principal certification offered by the ISFCE is the Certified Computer Examiner (CCE)®.  The ISFCE continually conducts research and development into new and emerging technologies and methods in the science of computer forensics.  This development is reflected in the certification(s) that are offered by the ISFCE. https://www.isfce.com/
  • The American Board of Forensic Document Examiners, Inc.® (ABFDE)—established in 1977, the board’s objectives are two-fold: 1) to establish, maintain and enhance standards of qualification for those who practice forensic document examination, and 2) to certify applicants who comply with ABFDE requirements for this expertise. In doing so, the board aims to safeguard the public interest by ensuring that anyone who claims to be a specialist in forensic document examination does, in fact, possess the necessary skills and qualifications. https://www.abfde.org/
  • Association of Certified Fraud Examiners (ACFE)— the world’s largest anti-fraud organization and premier provider of anti-fraud training and education. Together with more than 75,000 members, the ACFE is reducing business fraud worldwide and inspiring public confidence in the integrity and objectivity within the profession. http://www.acfe.com/
  • The American College of Forensic Examiners Institute (ACFEI)—an independent, scientific, and professional association representing forensic examiners worldwide. They actively promote the dissemination of forensic information and the continued advancement of forensic examination and consultation across the many professional fields of membership. They have elevated standards through education, credentials, and basic and advanced training, as well as Diplomate and Fellow status. http://www.acfei.com/
  • The National Computer Forensics Institute (NCFI)—an innovative facility and strategic partnership that serves to substantially enhance law enforcement efforts to suppress the continually evolving and increasing number of electronic crime cases affecting communities nationwide, as well as improve and strengthen the prosecution and adjudication of those cases. https://www.ncfi.usss.gov/ncfi/
  • International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists (IACIS)—a non-profit corporation composed entirely of volunteer computer forensic professionals dedicated to fostering and perpetuating educational excellence in the field of forensic computer science.  IACIS is composed of professional computer forensic practitioners from around the world.  Its membership is comprised of professionals from the federal, state, local and international law enforcement community, as well as the business and academic communities.  Collectively they share a passion for training and certification excellence in the forensic principles of computer examination. http://www.iacis.com/
  • FBI Forensic Science Communication—Computer forensic science was created to address the specific and articulated needs of law enforcement to make the most of this new form of electronic evidence. Computer forensic science is the science of acquiring, preserving, retrieving, and presenting data that has been processed electronically and stored on computer media. As a forensic discipline, nothing since DNA technology has had such a large potential effect on specific types of investigations and prosecutions as computer forensic science. https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/lab/forensic-science-communications/fsc/oct2000/index.htm/computer.htm
  • Computer Emergency Response Team Coordination Center (CERT/CC)—part of a federally funded research and development center at Carnegie Mellon University’s Software Engineering Institute in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. It was created in 1988 to coordinate communication among experts during security emergencies and also to help provide information to prevent future attacks. In addition to responding to security incidents and analyzing vulnerabilities in applications, CERT also develops and promotes secure systems, organizational security, coordinated response systems, and education and training. The CERT website is www.cert.org .
  • Institute for Security, Technology, and Society (ISTS)—located at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, the ISTS focuses on pursuing research and education for cybersecurity in order to advance information security and privacy. Its website is www.ists.dartmouth.edu .
  • Forum of Incident Response and Security Teams (FIRST)—an international security organization composed of more than 170 incident response teams from educational institutions, governments, and businesses. FIRST’s goal is to both prevent and quickly respond to local and international security incidents as well as promote information sharing. Its website is www.first.org .
  • SysAdmin, Audit, Network, Security (SANS) Institute—provides information, training, research, and other resources for security professionals. The SANS Institute website is www.sans.org .
  • InfraGard—The goal of InfraGard is to improve and extend information sharing between private industry and the FBI when dealing with critical national infrastructures. InfraGard provides both formal as well as information channels for exchanging information. Its URL is www.infragard.net .
  • Information Systems Security Association (ISSA)—an international organization of security professionals and practitioners that provides research and education regarding computer security. The ISSA also sponsors advanced security certification programs. Its Web site is www.issa.org .
  • National Security Institute (NSI)—provides information about a variety of security vulnerabilities and threats. The Web site is www.nsi.org .
  • Computer Security Resource Center (CSRC)—it is maintained by the National Institute of Standards and Technology and provides guidelines and assistance as security relates to the economic and national security interests of the U.S. The site is located at csrc.nist.gov .
  • Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE)—Located at cve.mitre.org , this site is a dictionary of reported information security vulnerabilities.
  • ISACA (Previously known as Information Systems Audit and Control Association)—As a nonprofit, global membership association for IT and information systems professionals, ISACA is committed to providing its diverse constituency of more than 140,000 professionals worldwide with the tools they need to achieve individual and organizational success. The benefits offered through the globally accepted research, certifications and community collaboration result in greater trust in, and value from, information systems. Through more than 200 chapters established in over 80 countries, ISACA provides its members with education, resource sharing, advocacy, professional networking, and a host of other benefits on a local level.

ISACA’s constituency is characterized by its diversity. The global community of ISACA members live and work in more than 180 countries worldwide and cover a variety of professional IT-related positions—some of which include IS auditor, consultant, educator, IS security professional, risk professional, chief information officer and internal auditor. Some are new to the field, others are at middle management levels and still others are in the most senior ranks. ISACA constituents work in nearly all industry categories, including financial and banking, public accounting, government and the public sector, and utilities and manufacturing. https://www.isaca.org/Pages/default.aspx

  • The International Information System Security Certification Consortium, Inc., (ISC)²® — the global, not-for-profit leader in educating and certifying cyber, information, software and infrastructure security professionals throughout their careers. They are recognized for Gold Standard certifications and world-class education programs. They provide vendor-neutral education products, career services, and Gold Standard credentials to professionals in more than 160 countries, and take pride in their reputation built on trust, integrity, and professionalism. The membership consists of an elite network that has over 110,000 certified industry professionals worldwide. https://www.isc2.org/
  • EC-Council—The International Council of E-Commerce Consultants (EC-Council) is a member-based organization that certifies individuals in various information security and e-business skills. EC-Council has been certified by American National Standards Institute to meet its ANSI 17024 standard. It is the owner and creator of the world-famous Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH), Computer Hacking Forensics Investigator (CHFI), and EC-Council Certified Security Analyst (ECSA)/License Penetration Tester (LPT) programs, as well as many others programs, that are offered in over 92 countries through a training network of more than 500 training partners globally. https://www.eccouncil.org/
  • Computing Technology Industry Association (CompTIA)—the voice of the world’s information technology (IT) industry. As a non-profit trade association, they advance the global interests of IT professionals and IT channel organizations and enable them to be more successful with industry-leading IT certifications and IT business credentials, IT education, resources and the ability to connect with like-minded, leading IT industry experts. https://www.comptia.org/
  • Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report (2008-2015)—Over the years, the Verizon Data Breach Investigations Report has helped companies and organizations gain key insights into how to manage risk and avoid security failings. A summary of some of the key findings year-over-year was compiled to make it easier to understand how the landscape has changed. Quantify the impact of a data breach with new data from the 2015 DBIR. http://www.verizonenterprise.com/DBIR/
  • SC Magazine for IT Security Professionals—an online periodical providing timely and topical articles, white papers, and webinars to keep the IT cybersecurity professional informed on current events and trends. http://www.scmagazine.com
  • SecureWorld—an online periodical providing timely and topical articles, white papers, and webinars to keep the IT cybersecurity professional informed on current events and trends. Their resources are as multi-dimensional as the threats, linking you to the larger forums, articles, webcasts, and gatherings that spark conversations…and solutions. http://www.secureworldexpo.com/
  • TechRepublic—an online publication and social community for IT professionals with advice on best practices, tools, current IT events, and trends for IT professionals. http://www.techrepublic.com/
  • FBI Cyber Crime Web site—As an intelligence-driven and a threat-focused national security organization with both intelligence and law enforcement responsibilities, the mission of the FBI is to protect and defend the United States against terrorist and foreign intelligence threats, to uphold and enforce the criminal laws of the United States, and to provide leadership and criminal justice services to federal, state, municipal, and international agencies and partners. The cyber crime Web site provides current information on high-tech crimes.  https://www.fbi.gov/about-us/investigate/cyber
  • United States Department of Homeland Security-Cyber Security—in light of the risk and potential consequences of cyber events, strengthening the security and resilience of cyberspace has become an important homeland security mission. http://www.dhs.gov/topic/cybersecurity